Some facts & figures

In response to your feedback, we have compiled some comparative statistics on the number of boat arrivals by (financial) year.

This table from the Refugee Council of Australia shows the composition of ‘unauthorised arrivals’ between 1997-98 and 2007-08 financial years.

Year No. overstayers Total no. unauthorised arrivals No. unauthorised arrivals by sea (and boats) No. unauthorised arrivals by air
97 – 98 50,950 1,715 157 (3 boats) 1,558
98 – 99 53,150 3,027 921 (42) 2,106
99 – 00 58,748 5,870 4,175 (75) 1,695
00 – 01 60,000 5,649 4,137 (54) 1,512
01 – 02 60,400 4,842 3,649 (23) 1,193
02 – 03 59,800 987 0 987
03 – 04 50,900 1,323 82 (3) 1,241
04 – 05 47,800 1,632 0 1,632
05 – 06 46,400 1,654 56 (4) 1,598
06 – 07 46,500 1,523 135 (5) 1,388
07 – 08 48,500 1,476 25 (3) 1,451

Note: The number of overstayers is estimated by DIAC at 30 June of each year.

Source: Refugee Council of Australia, Australia’s Refugee Program – facts and statistics[1]

In the 2008-09 financial year there were 1033 arrivals by boat, and 4916 in 2009-10 (as at 13 May 2010).[2]








Source: Janet Phillips and Harriet Spinks, ‘Boat Arrivals in Australia since 1976’ (2010)

While 4916 people seeking asylum in Australia have arrived by boat since 1 July 2009, a significant increase from the previous year, it is still minor when compared to the number of people estimated to be residing in Australia who have unlawfully overstayed their visa.[3] The majority category of unlawful overstayers are those on tourist visas.[4] This comparison can be seen in the graph below (figures used from table 1).

Note: due to insufficient data, the 2008-09 figure for the number of unlawful ‘visa overstayers’ has been used for the 2009-10 financial year. This will be updated when the data is available.








As demonstrated below, the relatively tiny number of arrivals to Australia by boat is even clearer when seen alongside net overseas migration.[5]









[1] Refugee Council of Australia, Australia’s Refugee Program – facts and statistics <http://www.refugeecouncil.org.au/arp/stats-02.html&gt;

[2] Janet Phillips and Harriet Spinks, ‘Boat Arrivals in Australia since 1976’ (2010) Background Note, Appendix A <http://www.aph.gov.au/library/pubs/bn/sp/BoatArrivals.htm&gt; at 14 August 2010.

[3] See comments by Australian Immigration Minister Senator Chris Evans: Australian Visa Bureau, ‘Most Australian visa overstayers ‘are English lads’ (Media Release, 22 October 2009).

[4] Ibid.

[5] Data sources:

  1. DIAC (2009) Population Flows: Immigration Aspects 2008-09 Edition, p 2.
  2. DIAC (2008) Population Flows: Immigration Aspects 2007-08 Edition, p 2.
  3. DIAC (2007) Population Flows: Immigration Aspects 2006-07 Edition, p 3.
  4. DIAC (2006) Population Flows: Immigration Aspects 2005-06 Edition, p 3.
  5. DIAC (2005) Population Flows: Immigration Aspects 2004-05 Edition p 3.
  6. DIAC (2004) Population Flows: Immigration Aspects 2003-04 Edition, p 3.
  7. DIAC (2003) Population Flows: Immigration Aspects 2002-03 Edition, p 3.
  8. DIAC (2002) Population Flows: Immigration Aspects 2001 Edition, p 3.
  9. DIAC (2000) Population Flows: Immigration Aspects 2000 Edition, p 2.
  10. ABS, ‘Overseas migration makes up half out population growth’ (Media Release, 24 February 1999).
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2 Comments

Filed under Frequently Quoted Inaccuracies (FQIs)

2 responses to “Some facts & figures

  1. Daniel

    Thanks for the excellent blog guys. It’s wonderful to see someone calmly presenting the facts on this issue.

    In regard to boat arrival statistics I have one question that I haven’t been able to find an answer for: are arrivals that were diverted offshore and to Nauru during Howard’s “Pacific Solution” counted in these figures?

    Thanks

  2. That is very attention-grabbing, You are a very skilled blogger. I’ve joined your feed and stay up for in search of extra of your magnificent post. Also, I’ve shared your web site in my social networks

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